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20130228
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fan. if the masters or u.s. open are on, i'm not going to interrupt her. she also loves football and that's appropriate because i've also learned that she is a master of the awbled. in 2008 i was heavily involved in an effort to bring volkswagen's u.s. production facility to chattanooga. just before one of the final meetings in tennessee, a planeful of decision-makers was stuck on the tarmac in germany without clear action to land in the u.s. some kind of paperwork issue. anybody who has been involved in a major recruitment effort knows that in something like this, even a small glitch can be a major setback. the volkswagen folks called me. i talked with ramona. i am not entitled sure what she did but i'm sure it was all legal and above board. at one point she was sitting there jockeying several phone calls on th on the switchboard d talking the plane off the runway in germany. the volkswagen executives landed in the u.s. highly impressed with ramona lessen. shortly thereafter, they chose chattanooga for her u.s. production facility. she was a home run no doubt. i think ramona's g
commander of u.s. forces in iraq general loy austin to lead the command which is responsible for operations of middle east and afghanistan. general austin was joined by u.s. command nominee general david rodriguez who is a top commander in afghanistan from 2007 to 2011. this hearing is chaired by carl levin of michigan. it is two hours. >> good morning everybody and welcome this morning that committee considers the nomination of two very distinguished officers to the two of the most active and challenging combatant commands. general lloyd austin united states army nominated to the commander u.s. central command, and general david rodriquez, u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. fees' to combat and commands, centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for the military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. both nominees have served the country with distinction, and i want to faint each of you for your decades of military service and a willingness to serve once again. i and stand general austin's life and rodriguez's life are with us this morning.
. lowering the direct cost of energy is key to helping the u.s. economy recover and prosper. absolutely key. next is clean. as we attempt to minimize indirect costs or the externalities by driving up these prices -- again, i would suggest that this is a policy that's doomed to economic and practical failure. instead, we have to be aware of the impacts of every type of energy and make rational, informed decisions on what is acceptable, what needs to be mitigated, how do we do just that. our challenge here is to reduce the cost of cleaner sources of energy, not raise the cost of existing sources. and when we talk about clean, what we've tried to do in this report is to give it some definition here. too often "clean" is treated as an absolute. but i would contend that it is better regarded as a comparison. a better definition of clean in my view and what we have used in this report is less intensive in global lifestyle impacts than its likeliest alternative. so just consider that. less global -- less intensive in global lifestyle impacts. so next, diversity. every type of energy clearly has it
for the world innovation. they are a big part of why the u.s. remains the destination for the world's best and brightest. investment in education leads to innovation, which leads to more opportunity and jobs for all. our problem? the investment we make is not yielding maximum returns. each year our colleges and universities graduate approximately 40,000 foreign nationals with masters and ph.d degrees, many of whom are then forced to leave the kanji because there are not enough visa slots in the immigration system to permit them to stay. so rather than being able to invent things here in america, grow businesses or start one of their own, they do all these things somewhere else. now, fiona zhou is here with us today. she is earning her master's at gw school of engineering and applied science. originally from china, she's been india united states for five years, studying operations research and the systems engineering department. if you talk to her you will see, she's pretty smart. she would like to stay here. she wants to invest her talents in america, and maybe even start her own company.
's number-one priority will be taking care of our troops. he is a veterans' advocate with the u.s.o. and he's won the respect and admiration of veterans' groups, in addition he's won the support of an extraordinary array of former secretaries of defense, ambassadors and diplomats, senior retired military leaders and in particular, two former members of this body who appeared with him at his testimony, former senators warren and nunn. i believe that chuck hagel is the right man for the challenges, the fiscal challenges that will confront the department of defense. put aside sequester, which i dearly hope will not happen, secretary panetta said it would be irresponsible for the congress to allow it to happen. many of us agree, it must be avoided. but apart from that challenge in the next month, or series of months, the long-term outlook for the department of defense is that it must do more with less, and secretary hagel, if he is confirmed, will have that management task, and he is one of the people in this country who is almost uniquely qualified to carry it out. and i believe that he will w
's with 93% of employers not using the program. outdated examples of e-verify errors. a u.s. citizen in tennessee actually receive an error notice from her employer. she went to the social security administration office to fix it. she thinks she fixes it at social security, but e-verify generates another error and she gets fired. another example, a u.s. citizen experienced an error because an employer made a simple mistake when they were typing the employee's social security number into the system. again, that worker went to a social security office, couldn't resolve the error there, e-verify generated a final nonconfirmation and the worker got fired. the most disturbing piece of all this is that for workers who lose their jobs because of an e-verify error, there's no formal process in place for them to get the jobs back and that's a problem for thousands of workers who experience these errors because you can imagine, these problems are only going to grow exponentially if we mandate the program. given these concerns, we have recommendations for how to move forward. first, congress ne
've heard recently that among developed nations the u.s. has fallen to the bottom as far as longevity is concerned. yet we're paying a lot more than other people. wouldn't it save substantial medicare costs if we veered away from the pill for every ill, that mindset that we've kind of adopted in this country and embrace, look at other measures such as prevention, alternatives and educating people on things like genetically-modified foods and the long-term dangers they can present? >> i don't know who wants to take this. this is, i mean, questions often come up about improving coverage of prevention sort of over the course of a lifetime and in medicare. um, and there's been a lot of in that, and there have been a lot of improvements lately. one of the sort of unfortunate realities of living in this town and working with the congressional budge office as a score -- budget office as a scorekeeper is sometimes those initiatives, people believe they will save money, the cbo scores an increase in spending depending on the preventive service because they don't have a lifetime view, or they m
points in the projected u.s. federal deficits over the remainder of this century. if mr. obama will not make his case, who will? the title of that budget -- that editorial -- "obama's budget shows failure of leadership." that is absolutely true, it was a failure of leadership. what about "the washington post" writing on a little further -- quote -- "white house budget director jacob j. lew has told advocates of reform that the white house thinks any significant plan offered by the president would simply become a target for a partisan attack." then he goes on to quote alice rivlin, saying -- quote -- "i would have preferred to see the administration get out front on addressing the entitlements and the tax reform that we need to reduce long-run deficits," said alice rivlin, a commission member on the deficit commission who served as budget director in the clinton white house. that's what alice rivlin, a wise commentator. a democrat but a wise commentator. but -- and she went on to say -- quote -- "but they clearly made a tactical decision." she meant a political decision. "the
when needed. the fiscal outlook which the u.s. army faces in fiscal year '13 is dire and to my knowledge unprecedented. in addition to the $180 billion. the combination of the continuing resolution a shortfall -- excuse me, the shortfall in oversays contingency operation funds for afghanistan and the sequester and fiscal year 2013 has resulted in a 17 to $18 billion shortfall to the army's operation and maintenance accounts. as well as an additional $6 billion to other programs. all of this will come in remaining seven months of this year. the fiscal year 2013 fiscal situation -- impact on all forces not serving in afghanistan or forward in korea. impacts which will have a significant impact to fiscal year 2014 and beyond. just a few of the acts we will be forced to take, are for example, we will curtail training for 80% of ground forces. this will impact our unit's basic warfighting skills and shortfall across critical specialty including aviation, intelligence, engineering, and even our ability to recruit soldiers in to our army. we have directed an immediate army hard wiring
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9